Three Ways to Explore Anchorage by Foot or Bike

By area, Anchorage is one of the largest cities in the United States, spanning over 1,900 square miles of mountain range, coastal plain, boreal forest, and bountiful bogland. Explore the area’s vibrant, varied environment with these three off-road routes, accessible to travelers of all speeds and abilities. Together, they cover more than 65 miles of lush local terrain. 

  1. Bike the Moose: The Moose Loop Initiative, launched by the Anchorage Park Foundation, leads bikers on a 32-mile loop of the city. The route forms the shape of a moose over a map of the city, running along some of Anchorage’s most iconic trails – the Lanie Fleischer Chester Creek Trail, the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail, the Campbell Creek Trail, and the Ship Creek Trail. Bring your own bike or secure a rental, then hit the trail: You’ll experience every inch of Anchorage topography, from Chugach Mountain foothills to coastal plains and midtown wetlands. Chances are good you'll see an actual moose along the way, too. Click here to view the full map.
  2. Walk the Solar System: This to-scale model of the solar system spans from downtown Anchorage to Kincaid Park, starting with the sun at the corner of 5th Avenue and G Street. The model is spaced to allow each single step to represent 186,000 miles – the distance light travels in one second. Meander down to Elderberry Park, then follow the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail west: At this rate, it should take approximately five-and-a-half hours to reach Kincaid Park’s Pluto, the same amount of time it takes a ray of light traveling from the sun. Want to travel faster than the speed of light? Just bring a bike or a pair of rollerblades.  
  3. Go Bird to Gird: The path running alongside the Seward Highway between Bird Point and Girdwood is an awe-inspiring way to enjoy the scenic beauty of Turnagain Arm. Park at the lot at milepost 101.5, then follow the paved trail south: The six-mile trail features gentle elevation gains and slight slopes before it emerges into Girdwood’s glacial valley, where cyclists can fill up on pizza, ice cream, or fresh-baked sweets before hopping back on the bike for the ride back to Bird Point.  

Looking for more extended local trails? Try these popular Anchorage hikes.